Loch Ness Monster 2023: Volunteers wanted for biggest ‘monster hunt’ in 50 years - how to apply

The Loch Ness Centre is looking for volunteers to take part in the biggest search in more than 50 years
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Lovers of Nessie, rejoice! The Loch Ness Centre is looking for volunteers to take part in the biggest search in more than 50 years for the mythical creature. The expedition takes place this month and is the biggest hunt since the Loch Ness Investigation Bureau studied the lake in 1972.

The centre is joining up with the Loch Ness Exploration research team and will be using drones fitted with infrared cameras to scan the lake. Additionally, volunteers will get to use  a hydrophone to monitor underwater sounds.

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Alan McKenna, of Loch Ness Exploration, said: “It’s our hope to inspire a new generation of Loch Ness enthusiasts and by joining this large-scale surface watch, you’ll have a real opportunity to personally contribute towards this fascinating mystery that has captivated so many people from around the world.”

​​Volunteers will report to Alan McKenna who will brief the ‘monster hunters’ on what to look out for and how to record findings. This will be followed by an afternoon debrief.

Paul Nixon, general manager of the Loch Ness Centre, added: “We are guardians of this unique story, and as well as investing in creating an unforgettable experience for visitors, we are committed to helping continue the search and unveil the mysteries that lie underneath the waters of the famous loch.

World famous for the monster that supposedly lurks beneath its surface, Loch Ness is Scotland's second longest loch at 36.2 kilometres and contains the greatest volume of water - meaning there's plenty of space for Nessie to hide.World famous for the monster that supposedly lurks beneath its surface, Loch Ness is Scotland's second longest loch at 36.2 kilometres and contains the greatest volume of water - meaning there's plenty of space for Nessie to hide.
World famous for the monster that supposedly lurks beneath its surface, Loch Ness is Scotland's second longest loch at 36.2 kilometres and contains the greatest volume of water - meaning there's plenty of space for Nessie to hide.

“The weekend gives an opportunity to search the waters in a way that has never been done before, and we can’t wait to see what we find.”

The search is to be held on 26 and 27 August. Volunteers looking to get involved should visit the Loch Ness website.