Doncaster floods: 'Huge relief' from residents as evacuation is a called off in Doncaster village

A cancelled evacuation has brought ‘huge relief to residents’ in a Doncaster village following wide-spread flooding.

Friday, 8th November 2019, 3:27 pm
Updated Friday, 8th November 2019, 3:28 pm
Flood defences hold the river away from houses at Kirk Sandall in Doncaster

Emergency services were stood down to take people away from there homes after reports the River Don had breached close to St Oswald Church in Kirk Sandall.

Police, firefighters, council staff have been praised for helping residents affecting by flooding in the area.

Ward councillor Andrea Robinson said people were jubilant when they were told they could stay put.

Coun Robinson also said flood defences installed after 2007 along the River Don ‘appeared to have worked’.

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“We’re all hugely relieved when the evacuation was stood down – I walked down the street and people were dancing on the doorstep telling other neighbours they don’t have to go,” she said.

“People have been working tirelessly, police officers, firefighters, council staff were all poised ready for an evacuation – minibuses were parked up ready to take people if it was necessary.

“Everyone’s been amazing in the circumstances – people really trying to pull together.

“The size of the River Don was concerning to see it was flowing into the canal and it was flowing over the top of the embankment.

“But other residents were saying in 2007 when floods devastated many areas like Kirk Sandall it was pouring over the top.

“The flood defences across the River Don appear to be working and have offset something which possibly could’ve been much worse.

“The council declared a climate emergency and we’ve got to be very mindful that we have to expect more and more of these extreme weather events and flood defences will have to be prioritised for the areas most at risk.

Coun Robinson added that people started to become concerned much earlier than when the flood hit.

“People here were concerned since the start of the month – the railway line here was under water already," she said.

“It's been a slow build up from that time and there was small pockets of flooding and standing water already from nearby fields and woodlands.

“I’ve been talking to people on the parish council and they told me they’ve seen areas of Edenthorpe underwater which they’ve never seen before.”