More than £5 million secured for cycling and walking routes in South Yorkshire

Improvements to walking and cycle routes across South Yorkshire are on the way after a grant of more than £5 million was secured.

Saturday, 14th November 2020, 1:18 pm

Sheffield City Region Mayoral Combined Authority has been given £5.46million from the Department for Transport’s Active Travel Fund to create safer, less polluted neighbourhoods.

Mayor Dan Jarvis said: “Enabling people to travel in a way which is healthier for both people and the planet is vital as our region recovers from the coronavirus pandemic.

"Building walking and cycling routes which connect people to places will be key to driving economic renewal and creating a stronger, greener and fairer economy for South Yorkshire.”

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The Sheaf Valley cycle and walking route in Sheffield will be improved thanks to the bid.

The money will be used to build safe cycle routes separated from cars to connect communities with shops and workplaces, and prevent rat-running through residential areas to improve air quality and safety for residents.

Proposed routes include segregated cycle lanes along the Sheaf Valley Route in Sheffield and the A635 Doncaster Road in Barnsley as well as improved walking and cycling routes between Warmsworth and Conisbrough in Doncaster, and improved active travel connections between Rotherham town centre and Broom.

Dame Sarah Storey, Active Travel Commissioner, said: “Across South Yorkshire around one third of households don't have access to a car so we need to ensure they have reliable options to access education, employment and services.”

Plans also include closing more roads in the region for through traffic, which would require consultation from residents. It is not known which areas have been identified to potentially become ‘active neighbourhoods’.

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