Doncaster taxis fares increased as council bosses hike prices due to ‘inflation’

Hackney carriage taxis outside Doncaster railway station
Hackney carriage taxis outside Doncaster railway station

Catching a taxi in Doncaster is set to become more expensive after bosses hiked prices.

Old rates started £3.80 adding £1.60 for every mile. But new prices will start at £4.05 for the first mile and £1.70 per mile after that for Hackney carriages licensed by Doncaster Council.

Night rates - which come into force between the hours of 11pm and 6am - are 20 pence more expensive than day rates.

Customers who vomit, soil or urinate themselves will also pay more. Fines have risen from £35 to £37.

Waiting times have also gone up to 32 pence a minute.

Bosses say the price hikes equate to an increase of six per cent and is needed due to inflation.

The changes could come in as soon as October 7.

The changes would put Doncaster 196th out of 326 councils across the UK in terms of price with number one being the most expensive.

Comparing the rest of South Yorkshire on a two-mile journey, Sheffield is the most expensive at £6.20, Doncaster at £5.75, Rotherham at £5.40 and Barnsley at £5.35.

Out of 185 taxi drivers consulted on the proposed changes, 58 responded.

Of the 58, 41 wanted an increase in fares, nine opposed the changes and eight made alternative proposals.

Of these eight, six suggested an increase of 10 per cent and four made proposals equating to increases of around 25 per cent for the first mile and 15 per cent for a 10 mile journey.

Two drivers asked for increased between six and 10 per cent.

In a report seen by councillors, licensing officer Paul Williams said: “Hackney carriages are operated by the private sector, albeit they are regulated by the council.

“Whilst the table of fares is set by the council, the council do not benefit directly from these fares. If the council choose not to increase the table of fares it will, in time, become uneconomic for Hackney carriage proprietors to operate.

“The table of fares was last increased in 2016 and an increase is seen to be reasonable due to increased overheads and the general increase in the cost of living since the last increase.

“The increased overheads include insurance, maintenance, vehicle prices and fuel prices. Using information obtained from the The Bank of England Inflation Calculator, the rate of inflation between 2016 and 2018 is approximately six per cent over the full period.”

The decision was made on September 3 and was made publicly available today (Wednesday).