Government inspector overturns Doncaster Council’s decision to reject Traveller site

A developer has won an appeal against Doncaster Council after officers rejected a plan for a Traveller site in the borough.

By George Torr, Local Democracy Reporter
Tuesday, 22nd February 2022, 6:04 pm

Applicant Jamie Raywood submitted plans to change the use of land for a ‘Travelling Show People’s’ yard to accommodate eight family units off Waggons Way in Stainforth.

But planning officers back in 2019 rejected the application and said an acoustic barrier and boundary treatments which made part of the plans were out of character for the area. The structure was included due the site’s location adjacent to the Doncaster/Hull railway line.

They added that the site would cause an ‘undue sense of isolation and separate the site from the community’.

Sign up to our daily newsletter

A view of the site. Applicant Jamie Raywood submitted plans to change the use of land for a ‘Travelling Show People's’ yard to accommodate eight family units off Waggons Way in Stainforth.

Mr Raywood submitted an appeal to the government’s planning inspectorate and they subsequently ruled in his favour.

The government planning inspectorate said the varied nature of the surroundings would result in the proposed acoustic barrier ‘not appearing’ to be harmful to the area.

Government planning inspector Darren Hendley, said: “I conclude that the proposed acoustic barrier would not have an unacceptable effect on the character and appearance of the area.

“It would comply with planning policy 11 as it would not cause significant harm to local amenity, and as its scale and form would be reasonably well integrated into the local townscape using boundary treatments and screening materials which are sympathetic to the existing urban form.

The area in Stainforth where the development will be situated. Applicant Jamie Raywood submitted plans to change the use of land for a ‘Travelling Show People's’ yard to accommodate eight family units off Waggons Way in Stainforth.

“In addition, the barrier would not give the impression that the site is being deliberately separated from the rest of the community because of the site’s location, despite that the barrier would be relatively high.

“The location of the proposed acoustic barrier would also not cause an undue sense of isolation and separate the site from the community. The vast majority of Stainforth is found on the opposite side of the site and the barrier would not extend along this boundary.”

According to the Showman’s Guild Model Planning Guidelines, Travelling showpeople require a permanent base where they can store, maintain and repair their equipment and where they can station their caravans, when they are not travelling for the purpose of their business.

This has traditionally been known as the winter quarters site as historically it has only been through the winter months of October until Easter – when a permanent base has been required.

Today, however, more showpeople are wishing to occupy these sites during periods of the summer; older family members require less seasonal occupation and a more permanent base assists in the education of children.