Farm sheds to office plans thrown out by Doncaster Council

Plans to transform a disused grain store into space for light industry on Green Belt in rural Doncaster has been thrown out by councillors following dozens of objections.

Monday, 10th February 2020, 4:21 pm

Applicant Elizabeth Nelson applied to the council for permission for a change of use on a site in the village off Leys Lane in Hampole.

Planning officers at Doncaster Council recommended that councillors grant the application and described it as something that would have a ‘limited impact on the openness of the Green Belt’.

The proposal included a proposed change of use from agricultural grain store to light industrial and/or storage/distribution as well as offices with associated means of access and parking.

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The application itself received 63 objections from residents in the surrounding area.

Dr Nick Ballinger, chairman of Hampole and Skelbrooke Parish Council said residents were against the application due to the impact on the Green Belt, traffic and transport issues as well as the harm to listed buildings located nearby.

“The latest amendments appear to make little difference to the potential damage and harm which could be done to this rural hamlet of Hampole, completely changing its character,” he said.

“The potential effects on residential amenity and safety, as well as disruption to residents daily lives, has not changed and remain very major concerns. The proposal is still seen as unacceptable by the vast majority of residents.”

In a planning report seen by councillors, it says: “The proposal is considered to be acceptable in policy terms having a limited impact on the openness of the Green Belt and the amenities of occupiers of neighbouring dwellings.

“The proposal is considered to be an acceptable and sustainable form of development in line with the National Planning Policy Framework.

“The report demonstrates that there are no material planning considerations that would significantly or demonstrably outweigh the social, economic or environmental benefits of the proposal in this location. The development would not cause undue harm to the Green Belt, neighbouring properties, heritage assets, the highway network or the wider character of the area.”

Councillors voted overwhelmingly against the proposal.