Oasis guru Alan McGee teams up with Sheffield bands to help homeless

Cabbage.
Cabbage.

Oasis guru Alan McGee is teaming up with bands from Sheffield for a series of gigs to raise money for homeless people.

The band's former manager launched the Musicians Against Homelessness #MAH2017 campaign last year to raise money for the homeless charity Crisis.

Sheffield-based Northern Exposure webzine has now stepped up to back the cause and will host two big Steel City events in the coming weeks.

Manchester band Cabbage will play a MAH benefit gig at the Leadmill on November 10. Also on the bill are the hotly tipped Welsh band Trampolene who have just been announced as support for Liam Gallagher, Sheffield band Sheafs and from London Sisteray.

Cabbage singer Lee Broadbent said: “Homelessness is the most visible invisible crime, as in we all choose to ignore it and yet it’s in every city and every town, it’s embarrassing for a first world country.”

Jack Jones from Trampolene added: “I’ve been homeless myself for a short while, but was lucky enough to have a van to live in and friends floors to sleep on.

"I can’t begin to imagine what its like to be homeless with no hope of getting a home, feeling hungry, unwanted and having cold weather just around the corner. I find it very hard to understand how anyone should be homeless in the UK in 2017, as it is a problem that surely can be solved.”

Cafe Totem, formerly the Rocking Chair, will host the second gig on December 7 which includes performances by Sheffield band The Time Sellers, Lucie Barrat, who is Libertines frontman Carl Barrat’s sister, The Kavaliers from Doncaster and Stray Scene from Scarborough.

Alan McGee said: “I am delighted that bands of this calibre want to be part of this campaign.

“The support in Sheffield has been tremendous and inspiring and it’s fantastic that so many quality bands have come forward.

“Although our primary concern is to combat the scourge of homelessness it is vital that the MAH gigs also give up-and-coming combos a chance to play to larger audiences.”