Doncaster horror plunge bridge at centre of death of Sheffield driver had seen cars 'strike barrier in wet weather'

Scene picture in Sprotborough, where a Nissan car has crashed through the Northbound barrier of the A1 motorway and landed in the River Don killing its occupant.
Scene picture in Sprotborough, where a Nissan car has crashed through the Northbound barrier of the A1 motorway and landed in the River Don killing its occupant.

A section of a Doncaster motorway bridge where a Sheffield driver plunged to his death had previously seen cars hit the barrier in wet weather, an inquest heard.

Motorist Muhammad Asqab, aged 39, of Fir Vale, Sheffield, died when his Nissan Primera plunged from the A1(M) viaduct where it crossed the River Don at Sprotbough, between junctions 36 and 37, on March 28, 2016.

Scene picture in Sprotborough, where a Nissan car has crashed through the Northbound barrier of the A1 motorway and landed in the River Don killing its occupant.

Scene picture in Sprotborough, where a Nissan car has crashed through the Northbound barrier of the A1 motorway and landed in the River Don killing its occupant.

It had followed wet weather.

Doncaster deputy coroner Fred Curtis opened an inquest into the death today.

Highways asset manager for the area, Nigel Yeatman, told the hearing that a section of the bridge had been been designated a 'hot spot' for flooding incidents after reports of standing water on May 24, 2014. August 14, 2014, and May 3, 2015.

Areas are declared hot-spots after they have been reported over flooding incidents three times.

Scene picture in Sprotborough, where a Nissan car has crashed through the Northbound barrier of the A1 motorway and landed in the River Don killing its occupant.

Scene picture in Sprotborough, where a Nissan car has crashed through the Northbound barrier of the A1 motorway and landed in the River Don killing its occupant.

Mr Curtis asked Mr Yeatman about the number of road traffic collisions which had been reported on the bridge.

Mr Yeatman said there had been 20 reported collisions, dating back to November 2009. Of those, five were on the nearside - which is the nearest to the edge. And three of those were on the northbound near side, which was the side Mr Asqab's car was travelling.

None had previously involved any injuries.

He said Incidents on August 14, 2014, and on May 3, 2015, had involved cars hitting standing water and then hitting the nearside parapet rail.

He said the road was regularly inspected, and would have an annual check, as well as patrols by highways officers looking for any matters of concern.

The last main inspection before Mr Asqab's death would have been on June 19, 2015, and its next scheduled inspection would have been June 2016.

Mr Yeatman said the contract between his firm, A-one+ and Highways England, had changed in June 2016 and more routine inspections were now expected, including inspections of the gulleys to take water away.

The inquest continues.