Doncaster church to remember fallen with poppy mural

A church congregation in Doncaster have installed an array of poppies, created with help from the surrounding community, for those soldiers who made the ultimate sacrifice. 

This year, with Remembrance Sunday falling on the 100th anniversary of the end of World War One, members of St Peter’s Church in Warmsworth decided to take part in their biggest poppy project to date. 

Rev. Ian Smith and Jill Sharp, church warden, pictured at St.Peter's Church, in Warmsworth, where hundreds of Poppies have been installed, creating a huge Poppy display around the church

Rev. Ian Smith and Jill Sharp, church warden, pictured at St.Peter's Church, in Warmsworth, where hundreds of Poppies have been installed, creating a huge Poppy display around the church

The installation – which has been created using hundreds of handmade poppies  – aims to honour the fallen soldiers and is particularly poignant as the Church was built during the Second World War. 

The church, which is known locally as the White Church, was consecrated in 1942, and was only a handful of churches to be constructed during this period.

In September the congregation and local children from the Beavers, Cubs and Scouts groups, started creating the poppies.

The children used a variation of potato printing, and red card whilst the congregation were asked to cut poppies out at home, with others opting to knit theirs. 

Rev. Ian Smith and Jill Sharp, church warden, pictured at St.Peter's Church, in Warmsworth, where hundreds of Poppies have been installed, creating a huge Poppy display around the church.

Rev. Ian Smith and Jill Sharp, church warden, pictured at St.Peter's Church, in Warmsworth, where hundreds of Poppies have been installed, creating a huge Poppy display around the church.

Jill Sharp, Church warden for St Peter’s Church said: “We normally hold a Remembrance service each year, but with it being the 100th anniversary I decided it would be nice for the community and the congregation to do something bigger than we'd done in previous years.

“We asked the congregation to cut out red poppies at home, whilst the uniform group printed them. The cubs did around 500 in one night. 

“The knitted ones have been put into a wreath. The church was built during the second world war, making it very apt that we honour those soldiers, especially with that link.”

Once completed, Jill collected the poppies ready for the mural, she added: “I installed it, as art is my thing but I couldn’t have done it without them, without their help it wouldn't have happened.

Rev. Ian Smith and Jill Sharp, church warden, pictured at St.Peter's Church, in Warmsworth, where hundreds of Poppies have been installed, creating a huge Poppy display around the church

Rev. Ian Smith and Jill Sharp, church warden, pictured at St.Peter's Church, in Warmsworth, where hundreds of Poppies have been installed, creating a huge Poppy display around the church

“It is singularly the biggest creative venture we have undertaken in many years.”

The installation is now open for the public, with the scouts will be visiting on November 5 to take a look at their hard work.

Jill said: “They can come and see what they’ve done, as they’ve only seen it in small bits not altogether. The idea is because it is up now people can pop in and take a look.

“We want to make the most of it, and would like as many people as possible to see it.”

There will be a Remembrance Sunday service on November 11 starting at 10am to display the mural at St Peter’s Church to visitors.

They will then lead a procession to Warmsworth Cemetery on Guest Lane, for a memorial service at 11am.