Plans approved for revamp of Epworth rectory 

A Walking Festival destination - St Andrew's Church in Epworth
A Walking Festival destination - St Andrew's Church in Epworth

A planning application to North Lincolnshire Council to revamp the run down rectory in Belton Road has been approved a church warden at St Andrews Church has confirmed.

The application has been put in by properties manager, Nicholas Turner, on behalf of the Lincoln Diocesan Trust and Board of Finance Limited.

It is for planning permission to revamp the existing rectory in Belton Road after it was decided that an original plan to demolish old school buildings and build a vicarage in Church Walk would be too costly.

One of the Church wardens at St Andrew’s Church, Penny Birks, confirmed that cost implications meant the new vicarage would not now be built.

However she said she was hopeful that work to revamp the rundown rectory in Belton Road in Epworth would start at some time this year.

She added: “It was eventually decided to put in an application to revamp the existing house in Belton Road because of cost factors of the original plan. This has been passed, tenders have been put out and we are just waiting for a start date for this. Also a new rector has yet to be appointed at St Andrews.”

She further added: “The application that has gone in is to vary conditions that were put on the original application to enable the site to be cleared.”

The Environment Team at North Lincolnshire Council have said: “No development shall take place until a Biodiversity Management Plan has been submitted to and approved in writing by the local planning authority.”

They further said the plan shall include detail of measures to avoid harm to bats and nesting birds during demolition, vegetation clearance and construction works.

Also, details of bat roosting features to be installed on the south facing elevation of the new dwelling.

In addition they request that details of nesting sites to be installed to support house sparrows, restrictions on lighting to avoid impacts on bat roosts, bat foraging areas, bird nesting sites and sensitive habitats.

They said the reason for this was “To conserve and enhance biodiversity in accordance with policies CS5 and CS17 of the Core Strategy”.

There were no other objections received from any other council departments, including ecology and highways.