How you can buy Doncaster-produced goods for presents this Christmas

Katy Lewin, from Doncaster Tourist Information, with beer from Doncaster Brewery
Katy Lewin, from Doncaster Tourist Information, with beer from Doncaster Brewery

The shopping days until Christmas are fast running out -- but there is still plenty of time to get a Doncaster-made present for a loved one.

Although we may not produce the children's television games, there are still plenty of products made right here on our own doorstep to put under the tree for Christmas morning, ranging from drinks to jewellery

An item of John Michael's dichroic glass jewellery, made in Doncaster

An item of John Michael's dichroic glass jewellery, made in Doncaster

Well versed in all-goods Doncaster, the borough's Tourist Information Centre staff are already well versed in what's made locally, and they have seen a steady stream of shoppers passing through their doors wanting home grown goodies.

The items which have proven popular with many residents this Christmas are really varied, said Karen Lewin, manager at Doncaster Tourist Information Centre.

She said: "I think people are always looking for something local at Christmas."

She said locally produced beers have already proved popular this Christmas.

Katy Lewin, from Doncaster Tourist Information, with an item of Anne Robertson jewellery

Katy Lewin, from Doncaster Tourist Information, with an item of Anne Robertson jewellery

Doncaster Brewery made a range of beers all named after well known Doncaster heritage themes.

The tipples produced by the firm at its Young Street base in the town centre include Mansion House, Sandhouse and Cheswold.

Karen said: "They are popular, especially around Christmas. They sell a lot in November and December."

Also proving popular is the Jam Horse's pickles and jams, produced at their factory at Wharf Road, near the town centre.

Katy Lewin, from Doncaster Tourist Information, with Jam Horse jam

Katy Lewin, from Doncaster Tourist Information, with Jam Horse jam

The firm moved to its present site from smaller premises in Cantley, and produce a range of flavours ranging from strawberry to pineapple, and mango chutney.

They have also proved popular at Christmas. "They've won some awards, they've not been going very long, but they're doing well at the moment," said Karen.

For those with a sweet tooth, the taste of Parkinsons Butterscotch, an iconic brand of Doncaster's past has been brought back.

The firm Amy Smith, based in Bawtry has brought back Doncaster Butterscotch using the same recipe that was used by Parkinsons.

Doncaster Butterscotch

Doncaster Butterscotch

"It's the recipe that was invented in Doncaster and favoured by Queen Victoria when she came to the races," said Karen. "That is popular all year round, and it always sells well around the St Leger Festival. For some reason it always proves popular when we have hot weather, as well."

The borough also has a burgeoning market in craft jewellery, and items from that sector are also likely to appear under trees in the town.

The work of Anne Robertson, produced in Town Moor is among that, and usually retails for £20 to £40.

Anne's work usually includes types of stones which are reputed to have therapeutic value, although many people buy them because of their appearance.

"Some like them because the stones are supposed to be calming, but I wear her work myself because I think they look good" said Karen. "They do tend to be popular at Christmas, and we sell a lot of these to tourists as well."

Another local jewellery producer is John Michael. His items, produced in Bessacarr are described as dichroic glass jewellery, and his each of his works is described as unique. The process he uses means even if similar glass is used, the product will look different.

A selection of the Fruit Gins produced by the McCallums.

A selection of the Fruit Gins produced by the McCallums.

"He tends to do pendands, bracelets and other bits too, for £10 to £30," said Karen.

Doncaster is also a producer of flavoured spirits, with both Brittains and MacCullums on the market.

Brittains, based at Kirk Sandall, produce both flavoured vodkas and flavoured gins. They range from miniatures 20 per cent in strength, to a premium range which is nearer 40 per cent in strength. Flavours include chocolate and butterscotch.

MacCullums, based at Finningley produce flavoured fruit gins using fruit gown on their own site. They also sell the product from the farm shop on Bank End Road where they are produced.