The 11 obscure parking laws which could land you a massive fine

Drivers are being warned to learn some of the country’s most obscure parking laws in order to avoid hefty fines.

Thursday, 10th December 2020, 12:06 pm
Drivers are being warned to learn some of the country’s most obscure parking laws in order to avoid hefty fines.

Motoring experts at LeaseCar.uk have identified 11 lesser-known parking rules which could land inexperienced drivers in hot water if broken. Both new and experienced drivers may be surprised to discover that putting out cones, bins or other obstacles to reserve a parking space could result in a fine for causing an obstruction.

Using the horn while a car is stationary – including whilst parked – is against the law.
Parking in a cycle lane, or on zig-zags at zebra crossings or outside of a school, isn’t allowed.

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Parking to load or unload on double yellow lines is only permitted if the load is of sufficient volume, weight or difficulty – collecting a newspaper from a shop doesn’t count.
The Highway Code says that you can’t park anywhere that may restrict access for emergency services, such as leaving a residential road too narrow for a fire engine.
Cars parked on a road where the speed limit is more than 30mph, any road within 10m of the nearest junction, facing away from the traffic or outside of a designated parking area, should technically have their sidelights on overnight.
To park more than 50cm away from the kerb could lead to an on the spot fine being issued.
When using any designated space, a car is not considered ‘in’ the space if the wheels are over any lines and could be ticketed.
Parking on a dropped curb could see a fixed penalty notice applied.
Putting out cones, bins or other obstacles to reserve a parking space is not permitted, as it could be interpreted as causing an obstruction resulting in a fine.
All engines should be switched off if leaving a vehicle for some time on a public road – the law states you have to be ‘in control’ of your vehicle so don’t leave it unattended and running.
Allowing a parked car to build up dirt could leave its registered owner open to prosecution, as having an unreadable number plate is illegal.