RUBBISH KITS: As Sheffield United’s effort is blasted the ‘worst ever’, we take a look at fashion disasters from Blades, Owls, Millers, Rovers, Reds and Spireites

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Sheffield United revealed their new home kit for next season on Saturday, to a mixed reaction - with some fans labeling it the worst they’d ever seen.

To test their theory, The Star trawled through our archives to rate the shirts of all six of our local clubs - with fairly interesting results.

United, of course, have history with kits that push the boundaries of taste (remember the gold Patrick/Midas away kit?) but their most eye-catching home effort came in 1995/96, when they ditched their famous stripes in favour of, er, diamonds. These diamonds certainly weren’t forever as stripes were re-introduced the following season.

VIDEO: Blades’ new kit gets a winning run out at Bramall Lane

There was no shapeshifting across the city at Hillsborough as Wednesday stuck largely to a blue and white stripe design, despite a brief flirtation with pinstripes in the late 1980s. By far their ugliest effort of recent times, however, was their Puma-made monstrosity of the mid ‘90s which, somehow, lasted between 1995 and 1997. Featuring a number of stripes, of varying width, the predominantly-white kit featured a ‘SWFC’ design on the chest and, for good measure, repeated it on the stomach section, for no apparent good reason.

But the honours, if you can say that, in this worst-kit pageant go to Doncaster Rovers, and their 1992/93 effort. After three years with manufacturer Ribero and all-white kits, Rovers switched to their now customary red-and-white hoops - but, just for good measure, decided to make them resemble a cardiograph. Rovers fans’ hearts were hardly sent racing a few years later, either, when the club introduced a shirt with bizarre patterned sleeves.

Finding a particularly offensive example from Chesterfield proved taxing, although few of their efforts could match the patriotic 1892/93 shirt - which just featured a large Union Jack across the front!

The Spireites ditched stripes in the 1940s in favour of a solid blue design, but brought them back briefly between 1998 and 2000. Although it wasn’t a particularly horrific design, Spireites’ standards through the years have been that high that this was deemed the worst. And it’s been solid blue ever since.

Barnsley started out life in blue and white stripes before switching to solid red, and haven’t looked back - save for a brief relapse in 1989/90 when they released a half-and-half red and white shirt, with added bizarre star sections all over the top half. Far from a star shirt, it was canned after a season and the Reds have been solid red ever since.

Rotherham’s kits have been fairly stellar over the years, too, but their decision to do away with their solid red shirts and introduce a strange diamond-patterned effort in 1995/96 stands out - for all the wrong reasons.

Mark Patterson shows diamonds aren't forever for Sheffield United

Mark Patterson shows diamonds aren't forever for Sheffield United

Of course, these are just our picks as your side’s worst shirts. Did you love the change it brought, or do you think another home shirt was the worst ever? Have your say in the comments or tweet us, @TheStarSport.

It takes something special to top Regi Blinker's hair in this picture - but Wednesday's kit just about manages it

It takes something special to top Regi Blinker's hair in this picture - but Wednesday's kit just about manages it

Doncaster Rovers' fans hardly had their hearts racing when this cardiograph-inspired effort, modelled here by Chris White, was revealed

Doncaster Rovers' fans hardly had their hearts racing when this cardiograph-inspired effort, modelled here by Chris White, was revealed

Our best of the worst award goes to Chesterfield for this shirt, worn by Jason Lee

Our best of the worst award goes to Chesterfield for this shirt, worn by Jason Lee

Even in black and white, it's easy to see why this star-spangled Barnsley effort made our 'top' six of shameful kits

Even in black and white, it's easy to see why this star-spangled Barnsley effort made our 'top' six of shameful kits