Youngsters dicing with death by swimming in Doncaster canals

The South Yorkshire Navigation  canal at Barnby Dun. Reports have been made of people swimming in a canal further along the Doncaster waterway
The South Yorkshire Navigation canal at Barnby Dun. Reports have been made of people swimming in a canal further along the Doncaster waterway

Youngsters swimming in a Doncaster canal during the heatwave have been warned they are dicing with death.

The warning comes almost a year after a man drowned in a quarry in Doncaster during a summer dip with a group of friends

A spokesman for the Canal and River Trust said today: “We know that the hot weather might make it tempting for people to cool off in the water. Our message is that it is not always safe to do so.

“We’ve had reports of people swimming at the Don Doors aqueduct on the New Junction Canal, which goes over the River Don in Kirk Bramwith.

“We have sent a team out to the site to see if there is anything further we can do to discourage people from swimming there. We’d always advise people to not swim, because it might not be safe.”

The warning comes almost a year after a Doncaster man drowned swimming in a quarry.

Matthew Mellor. 27, drowned in the old quarry off Hurst Lane, Auckley after going swimming with friends on July 21. He was having an early evening swim with eight friends

And a warning of the dangers of swimming in open water went out when Philip Law died aged 15 at Manvers Lake, Wath, in 2010

Meanwhile, during one of the hottest weeks Donaster has seen, medical experts are warning people to be careful.

Doncaster director of public health Dr Rupert Suckling urged people to ‘look after themselves and others’ as the high temperatures continue.

He said: “There’s two really simple messages, one is to look after yourself and the second is to look after others. Stay out of the sun, particularly in the hottest parts of the day, put sun cream on, wear loose fitting clothes and drink plenty, particularly water.

“Check on your neighbours if you’ve not seen them and see how they are.

“The main risks in this heat are around becoming dehydrated and the consequences of that.”

The advice has been echoed by doctors at Doncaster and Bassetlaw hospitals

Dr Tim Noble, emergency care group director, said: “High temperature can be dangerous, especially for people who may be particularly vulnerable such as older people, young children and those with serious illnesses.

“We are asking people to stay safe during the heatwave and also look out for vulnerable relatives and neighbours who might also be affected by the hot temperatures to help prevent a hospital stay.”

People most risk during a heatwave are older people especially women over 75, or those living on their own who are socially isolated.