Students are snubbing further study

Kate Mason, My Style column. Picture: Marie Caley D5417MC

Kate Mason, My Style column. Picture: Marie Caley D5417MC

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Getting exam results has to be one of life’s most stressful experiences.

Months of hard work and revision comes down to a few letters on a piece of paper that can make or break your future - or at least that what it feels like at the time.

A Generic Photo of students looking for their exam results . See PA Feature FAMILY Family Column. Picture credit should read: PA Photo/Thinkstockphotos. WARNING: This picture must only be used to accompany PA Feature FAMILY Family Column.

A Generic Photo of students looking for their exam results . See PA Feature FAMILY Family Column. Picture credit should read: PA Photo/Thinkstockphotos. WARNING: This picture must only be used to accompany PA Feature FAMILY Family Column.

Teachers and parents spend years brainwashing you into thinking your fate depends on exam results and whilst it great to get the grades life doesn’t end for those who fall below the benchmark.

As I visited schools around the borough this week interviewing youngsters about their results it reminded me of the feelings I had when I collected mine.

I remember turning up at college to get my A-Level results expecting to skulk off into a corner to read them in private.

No such luck - I had to sit there as my form tutor read them out to me with strategic dramatic pauses that would’ve made Dermot O’Leary from the X-Factor proud.

But it seems times have changed since my day (does that make me sounds old?)

Some schools have even started e-mailing students the results so they don’t even have to bother coming in to collect them - where’s the torturous suspense in that?

And UCAS contact students to let them know in advance if they’ve been accepted into their first choice university - so it’s fair to say results day isn’t the drama it used to be.

One other major difference that struck me was the number of students opting to undertake apprenticeships rather than go on to university.

When I was at college it was all about securing that prestigious place at university.

But I was surprised that students - even those who had racked up the A’s and A*’s - were snubbing three years of reading about their future profession to actually bite the bullet and get stuck in to the world of work.

Don’t get me wrong I wouldn’t have missed out on my time at university for the world, but I have to admit I was pleasantly surprised that so many were taking a different route.

With the ridiculous university fees I can completely understand why many would be reluctant to shell out on further education that rarely results in you landing a job remotely related to your course anyway.

There’s nothing worse than applying for jobs when you are graduating only to be knocked back because you have “no experience”. At least this way these apprentices won’t have that brick wall to run into.

An apprenticeship sounds like a win, win. Mind you I bet there’s no freshers week for those starting the nine to five.