Model of consistency

American dream: Keith Woodcock with one of his paintings at the CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia.
American dream: Keith Woodcock with one of his paintings at the CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia.
0
Have your say

IF you’re a man of a certain age, his work may look pretty familiar.

Not sure yet? Think of plastic kits, enamel paint and transparent bits of plastic which you couldn’t see through because you got too much glue on them!

Sea landing: One of Keith Woodcock's works for the exhibition.

Sea landing: One of Keith Woodcock's works for the exhibition.

If that sounds like something from your childhood bedroom, you may recognise the artist’s work which is currently on show at Doncaster’s Aeroventure air museum.

Painter Keith Woodcock was one of the team of artists who drew the pictures for the boxes which countained hundreds of Airfix model kits.

Keith, who was born in Bradford but lived for many years in Sheffield, has dozens of examples of his work on show at the museum at Doncaster Lakeside.

After careers in engineering, he decided in 1982 to become a full-time artist, concentrating on his major subject interests of aviation and motoring.

As well as his work for Airfix, he has also done paintings for Boeing, BAE Systems, Ford Germany, Cathay Pacific Airlines, The Post Office, the Royal Air Force, Alfa Romeo UK, the German Luftwaffe, the Norwegian Air Force, the RAF Benevolent Fund, the United States Government, and the Saudi Arabian Air Force.

His work for the US Government includes no fewer than five commissioned paintings for the CIA, which hang at the Agency’s headquarters at Langley, Virginia.

He said of his work: “An artist has the power to transcend the purely photographic image, to tell a story, create mood and give the painting life and an enduring appeal.”

A spokesman for Aeroventure said: “Nearly everyone in the UK will have seen some of Keith’s artistry - he has produced designs for Royal Mail stamps and Airfix kits, amongst other commercial work.

“The images on display in Doncaster depict a wide variety of scenes, starting with Edwardian flying meetings and running on through both First and Second World Wars to the present day, illustrating the whole history of aviation. “There are also examples of Keith’s motoring subjects, which include some of the true classics from the past.”

The exhibition will be on show at the air museum until Sunday September 18, as an addition to its normal exhibits.