There IS a way out of addiction

Don't knock what you haven't tried: Angela Moore  overcame her drug habit with rehabilitation.
Don't knock what you haven't tried: Angela Moore overcame her drug habit with rehabilitation.
0
Have your say

a FORMER drug addict who overcame her dependence with the help of a South Yorkshire rehabilitation programme has spoken out about her battle in the wake of the sudden death of pop star Amy Winehouse, to spread a message of hope that addiction can be overcome.

Angela Moore, from Dunscroft, Doncaster, was an amphetamine user for almost two decades.

Don't knock what you haven't tried: Angela Moore  overcame her drug habit with rehabilitation.

Don't knock what you haven't tried: Angela Moore overcame her drug habit with rehabilitation.

She says it wasn’t until her brother committed suicide after years of abusing cocaine and steroids that she decided to seek and accept help.

The 39-year-old was found begging on the streets by an NHS drugs worker from the Rotherham, Doncaster and South Humber NHS Foundation Trust who helped get her onto a rehabiliation programme in December 2008.

With support and structured day care at the New Beginnings programme in Balby, Doncaster, she says she has now overcome her addiction.

Angela wanted to share her experiences in the wake of the death of musician Amy Winehouse last week.

Tragic: Troubled star Amy Winehouse was found dead..

Tragic: Troubled star Amy Winehouse was found dead..

Although the cause of her death is still inconclusive, the singer’s long-running battle with addiction - dealt with in her biggest hit, Rehab, was well known.

Angela said: “ “My brother committed suicide, and he had been abusing cocaine and steroids.

“When that happened I was at rock bottom, because my mum had had problems with alcohol as well.

“I honestly believe that I’d be dead by now if it wasn’t for the help that I got.”

Paula Brocklesby, substance misuse service manager for the trust in Doncaster, offered reassurance to others fighting addiction that they are there to help.

She said: “Sometimes, people are able to get help, but they’re worried about future employment, confidentiality issues, and often they’re parents who are worried about losing their children.

“Part of our job is definitely reassuring people that we are here to help them, not take their children away. The NHS offers a plethora of different treatments and we are only interested in finding the right one for each person and helping them get back on their feet.”

Angela, who is now training to join the Doncaster intervention team as a drug support worker, urged anyone facing the same problems as she was to access the support on offer.

“Don’t knock what you haven’t tried,” she said. “There’s always a better way of living than the way you are now. Anything that might help save your life is worth a try.”

n Visit www.drughub.co.uk and www.rdash.nhs.uk to find out more about the services.