DCSIMG

Get in frame at the Minster

Revd Canon Paul Shackerley stands infront of the Doncaster Minster with his arms folded after a finial became dislodged and fell causing serious damage to the nave. Picture: Andrew Roe

Revd Canon Paul Shackerley stands infront of the Doncaster Minster with his arms folded after a finial became dislodged and fell causing serious damage to the nave. Picture: Andrew Roe

Budding photographers are battling it out to capture on camera one of Doncaster’s most historic buildings.

The hunt is on for amateur snappers to take stunning pictures of Doncaster Minster which will be turned into a set of postcards to help fund the church’s restoration appeal.

Canon Paul Shackerley, Vicar of Doncaster, said: “Your creativity could help us to raise vital funds towards the restoration of Doncaster Minster.

“The winning photographs will be made into postcards and sold during the Minster’s birthday year since becoming a Minster, to help us celebrate.”

Participants were invited to submit photos of the church across five themes relevant to the building - family, heritage, love, time and home.

The competition has been split into two age groups - under 17s and over 18s.

Judges are now sifting through the entries with those shortlisted being showcased at the Minster from May 31 to June 7. As well as the judging panel selecting the winners, the public will also be able to select an additional ‘people’s prize’ winner.

The winning pictures will be displayed at the Minster from July 1 to 15 to tie in with the tenth anniversary of the church being renamed as Doncaster Minster following its last incarnation as St George’s Minster.

And, while there is no cash prize, finalists will have their images turned into postcards which will be sold to the benefit of the Minster.

Work on the next phase of the restoration of the building is now under way.

Specialist teams have started work to repair crumbling stonework, revamp stained glass windows, and carry out interior improvements during a 20-week programme of refurbishment.

The work is focusing on the north transept which has suffered problems from water damage, with stonemasons, lime plasterers and specialist glazers all on site to carry out the repairs.

The roof of the transept is being replaced and stonework cleaned up with windows also being delicately cared for during the programme of works which will see the church stay open.

 

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