South Yorkshire landmarks added to list of ‘at risk’ places

Non-Conformist Chapel, General Cemetery, Sheffield. Copyright Historic England
Non-Conformist Chapel, General Cemetery, Sheffield. Copyright Historic England
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A farmhouse and a gothic church have been highlighted as among the most ‘at-risk’ historic sites in South Yorkshire.

English Heritage has named the locations in its latest Heritage At Risk register, which gives an annual snapshot of the health of the country’s historic environment.

Grade II*, 25 and 27  Rotherham High Street has come off the register. Copyright Historic England

Grade II*, 25 and 27 Rotherham High Street has come off the register. Copyright Historic England

Other sites have been removed from the list following restoration work.

Across Yorkshire, 704 historic sites feature on the register with 36 added – but the public body has also reported significant progress at 118 sites over the last 12 months, enough for them to be removed.

The Grade II listed Old Farmhouse, on Brightholmlee Lane, in Bradfield, Sheffield is listed among those under threat. The building dates back to 1484, but it is currently vacant and in poor condition.

The Church of St Mary, on High Street, Rawmarsh has been added to the register because parts of it, including the stained glass windows and timber roof structure, are in poor condition.

Christ church, Thorne Road, Doncaster. Picture: Marie Caley NSST Christchurch MC 2

Christ church, Thorne Road, Doncaster. Picture: Marie Caley NSST Christchurch MC 2

Cash from the Heritage Lottery Fund has been offered under the Grants for Places of Worship scheme to restore the Grade II listed building. Over the last five years, 43 per cent of Yorkshire’s heritage sites which were ‘at risk’ in 2010 have since been rescued.

Tammy Whitaker, the organisation’s heritage at risk principal, said: “This year we are celebrating an amazing achievement in Yorkshire.

“Over the last five years, 43 per cent of Yorkshire’s heritage sites at risk on our register in 2010 have been rescued, beating our 25 per cent target.

“We’d like to thank all the owners, volunteers, local authorities and funding partners that have made this possible.”

English Heritage has revealed conservation areas in Marr, Doncaster and Elsecar, Barnsley have been removed from the list alongside the Church of All Saints in Wath-upon-Dearne.

The nonconformist chapel in Sheffield’s General Cemetery has also been removed after repairs to the historic fabric and refurbishment of the interior were carried out with grant assistance from the Architectural Heritage Fund and Wren.

The restoration project has acted as a catalyst for further work in the historic cemetery, which remains at risk.

A late medieval public house on Rotherham High Street, known as The Three Cranes but now an antiques shop, has been removed from the list after repair works as part of the Rotherham Townscape Heritage Initiative left it in ‘excellent repair’, according to the English Heritage.

The building was first included on the list in 1999.

Christchurch, on Thorne Road, Doncaster is no longer deemed to be at risk as grant-aided remedial roof works and repairs to failing internal ceiling plaster have been completed.

Historic England said work is under way to repair the impressive, Grade II entrance gateway and wrought- iron gates at Oakes Park, in Norton, Sheffield after the organisation awarded it an £86,000 grant.

And progress is also being made in the Kelham Island Conservation Area.

The developers are nearing completion on repairs in Kelham Island to the historic Eagle Works, and have developed proposals for the repair of the Grade II-listed Green Lane Works.