Life-saving equipment on way for Isle schools

Pupils Anna-May Matthews and Kitty Brooks look over a defibrillator with South Axholme Chair of Governors, Paul Barratt, Headteacher Marie Lister, Cllr Liz Redfern, Cllr William Eckhardt, Andrew Percy MP and Cllr Ron Alcock.

Pupils Anna-May Matthews and Kitty Brooks look over a defibrillator with South Axholme Chair of Governors, Paul Barratt, Headteacher Marie Lister, Cllr Liz Redfern, Cllr William Eckhardt, Andrew Percy MP and Cllr Ron Alcock.

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Potentially life-saving defibrillators will be placed in two Isle schools, as part of a scheme funded by North Lincolnshire Council.

MP Andrew Percy secured the necessary £10,000 funding that was needed to place the defibrillators in North Lincolnshire secondary schools, after becoming aware of the worrying child mortality rate from cardiac arrest on school sites.

Both South Axholme Academy and the Axholme Academy in Epworth and Crowle will receive one of the machines which re-start the heart.

Six staff at each school will be trained on how to use the equipment.

Mr Percy, is a volunteer community first responder and is also a member of the House of Commons Health Select Committee.

He teamed up with the East Midlands Ambulance Trust to write the bid for the equipment.

North Lincolnshire Council then agreed to carry the scheme forward using cash from the community grants pot.

The MP said: “Survival rates for out of hospital cardiac arrests in this country are too low, with 270 children dying from them on school sites each year.

“As somebody who has had to try to resuscitate people in cardiac arrest myself, I have now become passionate about the need for more defibrillators in our communities and more CPR training.”

“For every minute after someone goes into cardiac arrest that CPR or defibrillation does not take place, the chance of survival drops by 10 per cent. In rural areas this can often mean that by the time an ambulance arrives resuscitation will not be successful.

“If only we had more defibrillators and more people trained in CPR then we could make a huge impact.

“That is why I came up with this scheme for local schools. I want them to use these defibrillators as a way of getting young people thinking about life-saving skills and training them in CPR.”

Coun Liz Redfern added: “Schools are community buildings so these defibrillators will be of real benefit to the community. If tied in with CPR training for pupils, it could mean we will have hundreds of trained lifesavers on the Isle.

“The council wants to go much further than just our rural secondary schools, which is why thanks to Andrew’s application, we are now looking at placing defibrillators in all our secondary schools.”

The defibrillators will be rolled out in the coming weeks.

There is currently no requirement for defibrillators to be kept on school premises.