Doncaster woman takes first steps into bodybuilding world, and says anyone can do it

Hannah Lomas loves the changes in her body since training harder than ever before to undertake a bodybuilding competition
Hannah Lomas loves the changes in her body since training harder than ever before to undertake a bodybuilding competition
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A Doncaster woman has made her first foray into the bodybuilding world, and she says that with the right approach, anyone can follow her footsteps.

Hannah Lomas, 20, competed in her first event on April 30.

She finished out of the places in the UK Bodybuilding and Fitness Federation's North West Championships, in the junior bikini fitness category.

Miss Lomas entered the Warrington event for the experience.

Competitors were judged by their body fat and form. They got more points for hair and makeup.

Now, Miss Lomas has been bitten by the competition bug - and seeing the positive changes to her body means she will compete again.

Miss Lomas, who lives at Lancaster Avenue, Kirk Sandall, said she'd been thinking about competing for some time, before finally taking the plunge.

She adopted a strict diet and training regime, for a 15 week preparation.

Miss Lomas trains six days per week at the gym.

"I love being at the gym and the feeling of that," the personal trainer said.

A diet rich in fish and chicken is required for success, but Miss Lomas still 'throws in' the odd chocolate bar.

"I've got a big sweet tooth," she said.

Her other vice is peanut butter.

"I still eat it, I just can't eat the whole jar," she said.

Miss Lomas said she didn't go out as much as the average 20-year-old, but still had the odd restaurant meal.

That's the beauty of flexible eating.

"You shouldn't feel guilty. It's only one meal," Miss Lomas said.

"It's different all the time.

"A lot of people think I'd be starving myself

One aspect of the diet stays the same: She drinks six litres of water every day.

It's this dedication which Miss Lomas says is the key to success, but she urges people looking at taking up the sport to do their research first.

"You've got to know what you're doing," she said.

"It takes time, a lot of dedication and commitment."

Her next event is run by the Physical Culture Association, and takes place in Cumbria in two weeks' time.