Clare's Law used by five South Yorkshire men and 226 women

Five men have contacted South Yorkshire Police about 'Clare's Law'
Five men have contacted South Yorkshire Police about 'Clare's Law'

Five men and 226 women have used 'Clare's Law' to ask South Yorkshire Police whether their partners were abusive in the past.

They made an approach, or had an application made on their behalf, to South Yorkshire Police Authority under The Domestic Violence Disclosure Scheme.

Also known as Clare’s Law, the scheme allows people to find out if their partners have a history of abuse.

People can apply for the information themselves or on behalf of a friend, relative or work colleague.

If police checks show a record of abusive behavior, or there is other information to indicate that someone is at risk, the police will consider sharing the information.

Ian McNicholl, of the ManKind charity, which supports male victims of domestic abuse, was repeatedly attacked by a partner who was later jailed.

He said he believes many people assume Clare's Law is for women only.

"Had this legislation been available to me, why would I have taken advantage of Clare’s Law? Why would I even think that Clare’s Law applied to me?" he said.

"The commonly used shorthand title for this legislation is not gender inclusive and it is now absolutely clear that the terminology used is creating barriers.

"This life changing legislation is available to both females and males right across South Yorkshire and men must be encouraged to come forward and seek help from the police.

"Please don’t be like me, make the request to South Yorkshire Police. Alternatively, I would encourage friends, family members and work colleagues to make the request on a behalf of a male they are concerned about."

Mark Brooks, chairman of the ManKind Initiative, said: “It is clear the domestic violence disclosure scheme is not being used widely enough and taken advantage of by men.

"We believe that this is because not enough men and, or, professionals think this legislation also applies to men.

"In the future we hope that in promoting this invaluable piece of legislation, it will encourage more men to use it and of course, more women too, and that professionals will make men aware that the legislation applies to them.”

They made an approach, or had an application made on their behalf, to South Yorkshire Police Authority under The Domestic Violence Disclosure Scheme.

Also known as Clare’s Law, the scheme allows people to find out if their partners have a history of abuse.

People can apply for the information themselves or on behalf of a friend, relative or work colleague.

If police checks show a record of abusive behavior, or there is other information to indicate that someone is at risk, the police will consider sharing the information.

Ian McNicholl, of the ManKind charity, which supports male victims of domestic abuse, was repeatedly attacked by a partner who was later jailed.

He said he believes many people assume Clare's Law is for women only.

"Had this legislation been available to me, why would I have taken advantage of Clare’s Law? Why would I even think that Clare’s Law applied to me?" he said.

"The commonly used shorthand title for this legislation is not gender inclusive and it is now absolutely clear that the terminology used is creating barriers.

"This life changing legislation is available to both females and males right across South Yorkshire and men must be encouraged to come forward and seek help from the police.

"Please don’t be like me, make the request to South Yorkshire Police. Alternatively, I would encourage friends, family members and work colleagues to make the request on a behalf of a male they are concerned about."

Mark Brooks, chairman of the ManKind Initiative, said: “It is clear the domestic violence disclosure scheme is not being used widely enough and taken advantage of by men.

"We believe that this is because not enough men and, or, professionals think this legislation also applies to men.

"In the future we hope that in promoting this invaluable piece of legislation, it will encourage more men to use it and of course, more women too, and that professionals will make men aware that the legislation applies to them.”

Clare's Law is named after 36-year-old Clare Wood, who was murdered by her ex-boyfriend in 2009.

She was strangled and set on fire at her home in Salford, Greater Manchester, in February 2009 by George Appleton, who had a record of violence against women.