Campaign to save trees from axe gathers pace

The avenue of trees on Bawtry Road date back to Queen Victoria's days but now they could be felled. Picture: Steve Taylor
The avenue of trees on Bawtry Road date back to Queen Victoria's days but now they could be felled. Picture: Steve Taylor

A CAMPAIGN to save a stretch of historic trees is picking up pace.

The strip of 80 lime trees are expected to be cut down after Doncaster Council found some of them to be unsafe, but campaigners are now petitioning the Government to save them.

The trees were planted along Bawtry Road, Tickhill, in 1897 for Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee.

Since the fight was first reported by the Free Press in March a facebook group - Save Tickhill’s Trees - has attracted 92 members. Its twitter account has more than 100 followers.

Protestor Katy Moss, said: “While we appreciate that a few may need felling due to health and safety reasons, the majority appear healthy and strong and have a high value to the community.

“No independent report has been done to our knowledge or, if it has, it is not available.

“Tickhill has a large conservation area, but these trees are not even protected by Tree Preservation Orders, hence our council don’t need planning permission to remove them.

“Some say it’s a done deal but, until the diggers arrive, we disagree.”

Tickhill Town Council and Doncaster Council agreed the trees should be replaced between 2013 and 2016 with 15ft oaks.

Residents have called upon tree expert, Jo Ryan, from York who in her ‘unbiased opinion’ thought that the trees should be good for another 100 years.

A report by Doncaster Council in 1995 indicated the trees were showing the effects of ageing and excess road salt and could become a danger.

Gill Gillies, assistant director of environment for Doncaster Council , said it was aware of residents’ concerns and the decision was made following a public meeting.

She added it was not the councils’ intention to fell healthy trees but records show there was a lot of dead wood from salt damage and further inspections and public consultations would take place before any felling.

To sign the petition visit http://epetitions.direct.gov.uk/petitions/32211.