An old garden seat that could leave you sitting pretty.....

Undated Handout Photo of the late 19th-century, Coalbrookdale Lily of the Valley pattern cast iron seat, stamped with model number and diamond registration stamp. This design was registered and patented at the Public Records Office on the 8th February 1864 by Coalbrookdale. See PA Feature GARDENING Gardening column. Picture credit should read: PA Photo/James Rylands at Summer Place Auctions Ltd. WARNING: This picture must only be used to accompany PA Feature GARDENING Gardening column.
Undated Handout Photo of the late 19th-century, Coalbrookdale Lily of the Valley pattern cast iron seat, stamped with model number and diamond registration stamp. This design was registered and patented at the Public Records Office on the 8th February 1864 by Coalbrookdale. See PA Feature GARDENING Gardening column. Picture credit should read: PA Photo/James Rylands at Summer Place Auctions Ltd. WARNING: This picture must only be used to accompany PA Feature GARDENING Gardening column.

Before you chuck out your old gardening tools or that urn you inherited from your grandmother, check out their value because Jonty Hearnden, presenter of the BBC1 show Cash In The Attic, says you could be sitting on a goldmine.

He reckons you may be able to sell anything from old paving slabs to large concrete urns, ancient tools, aged weathervanes and benches for hundreds – or even thousands – of pounds.

People who’ve inherited property or are clearing houses for relatives are the most likely candidates to find an Aladdin’s cave of treasure in the garden.

“The most common items that may be lying around are garden urns 
or statuary of the 20th century, the moulded urns and the moulded figurines and birdbaths which you think are just old and don’t have any value,” he says.

“Actually, there’s a very good secondhand value for those items because dealers and interior designers like urns which look really weathered.

“They might only be 20 to 40 years old, but there’s a definite market for antique-looking reproduction garden urns and other items.”

Such items may be made of concrete, otherwise known as reconstituted stone, and the ones fetching the most money have an 18th or 19th century feel to them, he says.

Birdbaths, weathervanes and other ephemera all have a value, he says.

“You could easily get £100 for a birdbath in an auction sale. It has to be weathered so that it doesn’t look new, which can take a few years.”

Coalbrookdale garden benches, which are made of highly ornate and Victorian-looking cast iron, are extremely sought-after items which can fetch between £3,000-£6,000, he observes.

The 19th century benches are often stamped Coalbrookdale or C-B Dale Co.

“People may be sitting on a fortune because they just don’t realise how expensive these benches are,” he says.

There is also a market for old garden tools, desired for their craftsmanship.

“Garden tools have a certain value. Don’t just throw them away.

“There will be somebody out there who wants them because they just love the feel of old wooden handles and cast metalware that’s not made to the same standard today.”